ORI Tag & Release

Started in 1984, the Oceanographic Research Institute’s Cooperative Fish Tagging Project (ORI-CFTP), is one of the longest running citizen science projects in Africa.  It involves the cooperation of anglers, who voluntarily tag and release their fish, and fishermen, who report, to ORI, the majority of re-caught tagged fish. Information from the project allows scientists to learn more about the movement patterns, growth rates, mortality rates and population dynamics of our important linefish species. This valuable information is used by scientists and managers for policy and decision making. The project has also helped towards changing the ethics of anglers with regard to catch-and-release. This added bonus goes a long way to improve angler awareness about our marine linefish species, as well as contributing towards sustainable fishing.

Anglers who are interested in finding out more or even joining the ORI-CFTP should visit our ORITAG website.

2019 Tagging News
Available Soon!
2018 Tagging News
New Tagging Videos

The Oceanographic Research Institute’s Cooperative Fish Tagging Project (ORI-CFTP) has recently released 15 new instructional tagging videos for our new tagging members, current members and members of the angling public. These videos will provide you with the background to the ORI-CFTP and what we need from anglers, as well as give you some important tips on how to be a more aware and responsible angler.

These tagging videos cover all aspects of the ORI-CFTP including: why tag and release a fish; your tagging kit contents; priority species we would like tagged; different hook types and preparation; how to measure different species; handling, landing and tagging various species from the shore and on a boat; recording and sending in tag release information; and most importantly reporting a recapture and filling in a tag recapture form. Viewers can also see how to handle a fish that may be suffering from barotrauma, a common occurrence in some species caught off a boat.

Included are videos on various hook types, knots and de-barbing hooks that ensure quick and safe hook removal from your fish. For new and existing members there are tips on kit maintenance. We encourage all our tagging members to watch and share these useful videos widely.

We thank South African Association for Marine Biological Research (SAAMBR) for funding, and Billi Jean Parker and Lynton Richards from Blue Oceans Media, for editing and creating these fantastic videos.

1. Introduction
This video provides a brief introduction to the Oceanographic Research Institute’s Cooperative Fish Tagging Project, a citizen science project that started way back in 1984!
2. Why Tag and Release a fish?
A brief explanation of the rationale behind tag and release and why we encourage anglers to join the Oceanographic Research Institute’s Cooperative Fish Tagging Project.
3. Your Tagging Kit
This video explains what you will get inside your tagging kit when you join the Oceanographic Research Institute’s Cooperative Fish Tagging Project as a member.
4. Priority Species
The Oceanographic Research Institute’s Cooperative Fish Tagging Project prioritises certain marine fish species for tag and release. This video will explain why we do this and what our priority tagging species are.
5. Hook Types - Preparation and Removal
When tagging and releasing fish, it is best to use certain types of hooks and to crimp the barbs on those hooks. This video will explain how to do this and will also show one or two tricks we have learned.
6. How to measure different fish species
It is very important to know how to measure the fish you have caught correctly. This video will show you exactly how to do this for different types of fish and for different types of length measurements.
Video will be available soon
7. Handling and Tagging a FISH (Shore)
This is an extremely important video which will show you exactly how to handle and tag a fish caught from the shore to ensure its best chance of survival.
Video will be available soon
8. Handling and Tagging a FISH (Boat)
This video will show you exactly how to handle and tag a fish caught from a boat to ensure its best chance of survival. It also shows how to release a fish that is suffering from barotrauma.
Video will be available soon
9. Handling and Tagging a SHARK (Shore)
Handling and tagging sharks caught from the shore can be tricky. This video will show you how we recommend it is done to ensure the shark’s best chance of survival.
Video will be available soon
10. Handling and Tagging a SHARK (Boat)
Handling and tagging sharks caught from a boat requires careful preparation. This video will show you how we recommend it is done to ensure the shark’s best chance of survival.
Video will be available soon
11. Handling and Tagging a RAY (Shore)
Rays are notoriously difficult to handle and tag. This video will explain exactly how to do this properly.
Video will be available soon
12. Handling and Tagging a Billfish
This short video will show you best practise when it comes to handling and tagging billfish.
Video will be available soon
13. Recording and sending Tag & Release information
This video will explain exactly how we would like our tagging members to record and send us their tag and release information.
Video will be available soon
14. Reporting a Recapture
This is a very important video that explains exactly how to record and report the capture of a tagged fish. We strongly encourage both members of the Oceanographic Research Institute Cooperative Fish Tagging Project as well as members of the angling public to watch this video.
Video will be available soon
15. Filling in the online Recapture Form
For those that like using the internet, this video explains how to report the recapture of a tagged fish online.
Report a tagged fish
Please record the following details:


Otherwise, please contact:

Tel: +27 31 328 8159
Fax: +27 31 328 8188
Cell: +27 79 529 0711 (call/sms/WhatsApp)
E-mail: oritag@ori.org.za

Stay Connected